• Our Blogger

    Fr. Joseph Jenkins

  • The blog header depicts an important and yet mis-understood New Testament scene, Jesus flogging the money-changers out of the temple. I selected it because the faith that gives us consolation can also make us very uncomfortable. Both Divine Mercy and Divine Justice meet in Jesus. Priests are ministers of reconciliation, but never at the cost of truth. In or out of season, we must be courageous in preaching and living out the Gospel of Life. The title of my blog is a play on words, not Flogger Priest but Blogger Priest.

  • Archives

  • Categories

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

    Reece on Ask a Priest
    Brian Delafayette on Ask a Priest
    Anonymous on Ask a Priest
    Anonymous on Ask a Priest
    Amie on Ask a Priest

Seeing Ourselves in Peter’s Denial

Questiondownload

I am a Lenten backslider.  There is so much I could have done but have failed to do, especially to help the downtrodden. As I think about my own spiritual failures I am reminded of Peter’s thrice denial.  Was his denial of Christ a mortal sin?  After he was forgiven by Jesus did he sin again?  Returning to myself, despite going to Confession I have defiled myself by my actions

Response

Peter’s denial of Christ was serious, but he was healed by the risen Christ on the beach when asked three times, DO YOU LOVE ME? Sin is ultimately a failure to love as we should. Regarding your life, I cannot speak to the gravity of sin without specificity, but it is true that we can sin by the things we do and by “the things we fail to do.” In any case, in light of Peter, remember that our Lord is merciful. We are all weak and sinful. Jesus heals us all the same.

Was Peter sinless after his encounter with the risen Jesus on the beach?  All we can know is that Jesus would always lift him up if he should stumble.  Such is the message that you must take to heart.

If past selfishness troubles you, there is still time to embrace a life of charity.  You have stumbled upon a profound truth, “Charity covers a multitude of sins.”

Our Lord would have us forgive as he forgives.  We read in Matthew 18:21-22:

Then Peter approaching asked him, “Lord, if my brother sins against me, how often must I forgive him? As many as seven times?” Jesus answered, “I say to you, not seven times but seventy-seven times.

This colloquialism or saying literally meant endless forgiveness.  God’s mercy is always available to those with contrite hearts.  Accept his forgiveness and share it with others.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s