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    Fr. Joseph Jenkins

  • The blog header depicts an important and yet mis-understood New Testament scene, Jesus flogging the money-changers out of the temple. I selected it because the faith that gives us consolation can also make us very uncomfortable. Both Divine Mercy and Divine Justice meet in Jesus. Priests are ministers of reconciliation, but never at the cost of truth. In or out of season, we must be courageous in preaching and living out the Gospel of Life. The title of my blog is a play on words, not Flogger Priest but Blogger Priest.

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Women Ministers

1 Corinthians 14:34: As in all the churches of the saints, the women should keep silence in the churches. For they are not permitted to speak, but should be subordinate, even as the law says.

This is one of the verses that made the new disciplines regarding women readers, servers, and extraordinary ministers so problematical. Even now, officially installed Lectors and Acolytes must be men. It may have been that women were taking over leadership positions in Corinth or that there was some tie to the nonsensical babble that pagan women and goddess worship employed. In any case, the priesthood was then and now reserved to men. While disciplines can change regarding the lesser ministries; the Holy Father has affirmed the tradition that ONLY men can be ordained to holy orders. Unlike Protestant churches, they cannot be true pastors or ministers over congregations. It should be noted that Catholic law prohibits them from proclaiming the Gospel at Mass and from liturgical preaching. This reservation is no incrimination upon their human dignity; rather, it is a guarded imitation of the pattern given us by our Lord and the apostolic community. Gender is not seen as an accidental of personhood, but as a constitutive component of our identity. As such the maleness of the priest resonates in harmony with that of Christ to whom he has been sacramentally configured through ordination. He can thus function in the person of Christ, the head of the Church. He is a true icon of Christ. He signifies Christ the bridegroom at the marriage banquet of the Mass to his bride, the Church. Women priests in this context would imply a sort of sacramental lesbianism.

For more such reading, contact me about getting my book, DEFENDING THE CATHOLIC FAITH.